Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

Julia Fischer: Bach Done Well

02.26.09
Academy of St Martin in the Fields
Washington Post

For someone who's traveled the world during the past several years, playing Dvorak, Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart, Glazunov and Shostakovich, 25-year-old violinist Julia Fischer gave a convincing argument at Strathmore on Tuesday, that, in fact, Bach is her main man and that, at the moment, she is Bach's finest purveyor. Fischer led the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields in a stunning program that enclosed Bach's two Violin Concerti between a pair of British bookends: Britten's "Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge" and the Walton Sonata for Strings.

The 22 strings of the academy are used to performing without a conductor, and this was the 10th concert in their current tour with Fischer (celebrating the academy's 50th year and the issuing of their latest smash hit CD of Bach Violin Concerti) so it is not surprising that the ensemble, even in Walton's intricate games of rhythmic tag, was exemplary. What was surprising was that, even this far along in the tour, the musicians still seemed excited by their own musicmaking and by Fischer's musical ideas.

Fischer's approach to Bach is one of supreme confidence in the ability of Bach's music to define itself. She didn't slather lyrical sweetness over the long melodies of the slow movements or overlay harmony-implying arpeggios with subtle rubato effects. With a bow arm to die for, she simply played with utter rhythmic integrity, drew out long phrases in pianissimos that could have been heard for miles and brought the academy artists with her into her musical world as the chamber colleagues that they, indeed, were.