Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

Acclaim for Drew Petersen’s Debut Steinway Recording

08.06.18
Drew Petersen

"We begin with the headily Impressionistic Fantasy Pieces of Griffes, which are evocatively coloured, with Petersen particularly relishing the Slavic tinges of the third piece. From Ives’s Concord Sonata he excerpts the luscious third movement, ‘The Alcotts’. It’s played with palpable affection, and the way he references Ives’s appropriation of the ‘fate’ motif from Beethoven’s Fifth without overstating it is just one example of the subtlety of his musicianship."
Gramophone

"A really stunning, full-bodied sound makes this disc shine. Petersen showcases American piano works with superb technique and measured voicing. A very palatable selection." ****
BBC Music Magazine

"Fearless playing, with recordings to match; this pianist is destined for great things.”
Music Web International

“All too often, piano recital programs are predictable: they tend to focus on popular favorites (Chopin, Brahms, Bach, etc.) or on virtuosic display (Scriabin, Liszt, Bach, etc.), or both. This one, by the impressive young pianist Drew Petersen, does neither. Instead, it focuses on works by American composers–some of them more familiar (Charles Ives’ “Concord” sonata; Samuel Barber’s E-flat sonata) and some of them less so (Elliott Carter’s only piano sonata, played here with hardheaded brilliance, and the premiere recording of Judith Lang Zaimont’s Attars, in which she proves that “bracing” and “impressionistic” aren’t necessarily a contradiction in terms). Here the focus is on Americanness, and the kaleidoscopic manifestation of that quality across a diverse spectrum of compositional voices during the past century. As a pianist, Petersen is a wonder–but he keeps the focus on the pieces themselves, and in so doing makes a powerful argument for what might seem at first to be a rather idiosyncratic program.”
CD Hotlist

“Another disc from Steinway & Sons brings us piano music by American composers, including a living composer, Judith Lang Zaimont, born in 1945. For last year’s American Pianists Awards, she wrote a piece—a suite, really—called Attars. The competition was won by Drew Petersen. And he is the pianist on this new disc.

I went to a dictionary for a definition of “attar”: “a perfume or essential oil obtained from flowers or petals.” In her suite, Zaimont has five attars, or five movements, in any case: “Roses,” “Musk,” “Pink Lotus,” “Jasmine,” and “Frangipani” (what a wonderful name).

“Roses” is pleasantly sweeping, or nicely rippling. Perhaps the fragrance is moving through the air. This music strikes me as Debussyan. The next movement, “Musk,” is Debussyan too, and bluesy. How about “Frangipani”? A bold and delightful waltz, possibly tipsy.

I will say about Attars what I said about Préludes fragiles: they ought to be programmed (and this is especially true of the newer work).
The New Criterion

"This release marks the recording debut of Drew Peterson, a fast-rising American pianist still in the program at the Juilliard School. His all-American program, which he has performed live in whole or in part many times, is suited to the mission of the Steinway & Sons label, which has done well to sign him to its roster.”
All Music