Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

Ailey dancers strike gold in annual UC visit

04.11.18
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
San Francisco Chronicle

There’s no sound in the dance world as contagious as the thunderclap of cheering that emanates from an audience responding to a performance of Alvin Ailey’s classic “Revelations.” The piece, as well as the ovations, were there again Tuesday, April 10, at Berkeley’s Zellerbach Hall, where the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater opened its weeklong 50th anniversary visit to the UC campus.

Ailey has forged a singular bond with Cal Performances, allowing us to chart the troupe’s evolution through the decades. Happily, the company is looking snazzy under the artistic direction of Robert Battle, whose programming for opening night included one West Coast premiere and one revival, Talley Beatty’s 1982 “Stack-Up.” Over the years, we have witnessed an outpouring of African American choreography from the company, giving voice to worthy artists who might otherwise have remained silent.

Beatty’s was one of those voices, and the revival, restaged by the company’s indispensable associate artistic director, Masazumi Chaya, looks much as one remembers it from previous encounters. “Stack-Up” generated controversy in its time; it may have been the first dance to deal with drug addiction in African American society. Perhaps the work has lost its sting over the years and the message has been somewhat muted, but Tuesday’s vibrant performance drew you in as the hapless protagonist succumbed to the lure of narcotics.

The 17 dancers do everything, including shaking their booties, to make the urban netherworld look inviting. The music is recorded jazz-pop of the period. Carol Vollet Kingston’s costumes are a riot of color, while the backdrop, inspired by a painting by Romare Bearden, broods and beckons. Jamar Roberts’ dealer, fascinating in red, easily drew willing Yannick Lebrun into his world. Jacquelin Harris and Jacqueline Green made significant contributions to this performance.

Roberts, one of the Ailey group’s stellar dancing talents, also has choreographing chops. His first work for the company, “Members Don’t Get Weary,” received its West Coast premiere Tuesday, and it seemed more than slightly promising. A mood piece for nine dancers, it was inspired by saxophonist John Coltrane, and Roberts showed a real feeling for the tone and structure of the music. Most of the time, the dancers travel as a group, and the contractions and deep backbends recall Ailey’s mentor, pioneer choreographer Lester Horton, not a bad model.

Roberts has clothed almost everybody in blue, all wearing modified sombreros; so when Green materializes in a wine-red dress, she gets noticed and then some. Renaldo Maurice and Chalvar Monteiro stood out from the uniformly fine team. The lighting by Brandon Stirling Baker was terrific.
 
Read the rest of the review here