Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

A pleasant, if not ravishing, KC Jukebox

01.31.17
Mason Bates
The Washington Post

By Anne Midgette

You’re never going to please everybody when it comes to contemporary music — or, heck, when it comes to music at all. Go for the classics and you’re too traditional. Go for a young audience and you’re not paying enough attention to those who already love the art form. And so on.

So you have to hand it to Mason Bates for his KC Jukebox series. Devoted to contemporary music and launched when Bates arrived as the Kennedy Center’s composer-in-residence in the fall of 2015, it has been an uneven and varied sequence of musical experiences so far, but each performance certainly has a sense of an event — and draws in a disparate crowd with a visible mix of ages and styles that seems distinctive, in my experience, among Kennedy Center music events.

For the latest one, “Ravishment,” on Monday night, the Kennedy Center’s upstairs Atrium was bathed in a silvery-blue-lit haze, with a stage at one end of the space, a DJ near the other end and listeners seated at small tables and on sofas, partaking of food and drink from a cash bar by the entrance. One of the goals of such events is to create an atmosphere that makes people willing to listen to things they don’t know and linger after the last notes of music — in this case, from John Adams’s second string quartet — have died away, and in this, the evening succeeded.

Another plus is the way these concerts have integrated musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra and the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra. The next three KC Jukebox events, to be sure, will spotlight outside musicians (including the vocal ensemble Chanticleer on May 2 and the DJ collaborative Thievery Corporation on May 15). But highlights from the Kennedy Center’s home team Monday included Aaron Goldman, the NSO’s principal flute, and Rachel Young, a section cellist who appeared in all five of the pieces, including making her way valiantly through the Adams as part of a string quartet that clearly wasn’t used to playing together.

Read the full story here