Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

A Mahler under control

11.11.16
Marin Alsop
The Washington Post

The performance of Mahler’s Sixth Symphony that Marin Alsop conducted with the Baltimore Symphony at Strathmore Hall on Thursday was a far cry from the kind of Mahler her celebrated mentor, Leonard Bernstein, used to conduct.

Bernstein’s uncompromising Mahler was all about heat and color and incident and heart-on-the-sleeve angst. Dynamics could rocket from unearthly quiet to heaven-storming volume, and tempos were expressively elastic.

Alsop is a far more controlled Mahler interpreter. That’s not to say she was unengaged Thursday. The opening movement’s pastoral episode had diaphanous, almost Mendelssohnian charm. The sardonic laughter built into the wind writing in the Scherzo was loud and clear. And Alsop generated a fair head of steam during the second half of the Finale.

But in this most restless and despairing symphony of the Mahler cycle, Alsop chose cogency over trenchancy much of the time. Limning the work’s structure in long, lucid paragraphs, she led a reading of consistent tempos and subtly calibrated internal balan­ces, allowing dramatic events to organically unfold.

Read the full review.