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Review: Benjamin Beilman (violin)/ Andrew Tyson (piano) at Perth Concert Hall

10.05.16
Benjamin Beilman
The West Australian

By Neville Cohn

Leos Janacek’s too-rarely heard Violin Sonata takes us into an unforgettably idiosyncratic world. It requires musicians who have the ability to penetrate to the work’s emotional core — and that doesn’t always happen. In less than assured hands, the sonata can so easily sound formless, a pointless jumble.

On Monday evening, though, it flashed into fascinating life with violinist Benjamin Beilman and pianist Andrew Tyson succeeding brilliantly in giving point and meaning to its myriad subtleties in episodes evoking moods suggestive of emotional disintegration bordering at times on hysteria.

Courtesy of this gifted duo, young in years but astonishingly mature and insightful in interpretative terms, we were able to savour the unique world of a unique mind. Here, Beilman and Tyson ascended Olympus.



Beilman and Tyson seemed positively to relish coming to grips with Saint-Saens’ Sonata No. 1 in D minor.



And it is only musicians of the most gifted kind who are able to bring this off with confidence.

4 stars

Read the full review here