Recent News
01.13.19
James Conlon
Dull Bruch from Zuk, blazing Bartók from Conlon and New World at Arsht
South Florida Classical Review
01.11.19
Sir Andrew Davis
With conductor Andrew Davis, the BSO considers the big picture
The Boston Globe
01.10.19
Louis Lortie
PIANIST LOUIS LORTIE JOINS THE ROSTER
01.10.19
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER CELEBRATES GROUNDBREAKING FOUNDER DURING 60TH ANNIVERSARY NORTH AMERICAN TOUR FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2019
Ailey PressRoom
01.07.19
Teddy Abrams, Inon Barnatan, The Knights
WQXR Presents “19 for 19”: Artists to Watch in the Upcoming Year
WQXR
01.02.19
Ward Stare
Auld acquaintance is not forgotten at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's New Year's Eve concert
KDHX
01.01.19
Marin Alsop, Lawrence Foster, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Mariss Jansons, David Robertson, Donald Runnicles, Patrick Summers, Emmanuel Villaume, Conrad Tao, Andrew von Oeyen, Inon Barnatan, Daniil Trifonov, Blake Pouliot, Isabelle Faust, Edgar Moreau, Yo-Yo Ma, Alisa Weilerstein, Colin Currie Group , Brooklyn Rider , Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Munich , Lisette Oropesa, Michelle DeYoung, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Christian Van Horn, Storm Large
Best of 2018
12.17.18
Richard Kaufman
Cleveland Orchestra, Choruses make it feel like Christmas at Severance Hall
Cleveland Plain Dealer
12.17.18
Vienna Boys Choir
Vienna Boys Choir mix it up with a cosmopolitan “Christmas in Vienna”
New York Classical Review
12.14.18
Storm Large
High-energy holidays with Storm Large at the Sun
KDHX

News archive »

An evening of musical innocence from the SLSO

04.03.16
David Robertson, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

By Sarah Bryan Miller

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra music director David Robertson is a man of many gifts. One of the most significant is his aptitude for putting together musical programs that fit intellectually as well as musically, that provides the audience with food for thought as well as musical balance, entertainment and a set of timings that work well together.

The weekend’s programming at Powell Symphony Hall was a perfect case in point. Entitled “Songs of Innocence,” it drew together a trio of stylistically different works and underlined the attitudes — chiefly a childlike view of life, and beyond — they have in common.

His conducting and the orchestra’s playing of them was near-ideal.

The most familiar work of the three, Maurice Ravel’s 1911 “Ma mere l’Oye (Mother Goose)” Suite, opened the concert. A set of five fairy-tale vignettes, it opens and closing with Sleeping Beauty’s enchanted slumber and awakening.

In between come “Tom Thumb,” “Laideronnette (Little Ugly One),” and “Conversations of the Beauty and the Beast.”

Appropriately, it’s one of Ravel’s most enchanting scores, each tale clearly told with fitting music, from the Orientalisms of “Laideronnette” to the clarinet and bassoon discussion of “Beauty,” and an apotheosis to conclude.

On Saturday night, there was particularly fine playing from principal clarinet Scott Andrews, principal bassoon Andrew Cuneo and concertmaster David Halen.

Read the full review.